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that in the people who are speaking out and those who are not, there's a shift in attitudes, as the "new york times" puts in their headline today, i think will be lasting. i don't know how any -- there are several networks, not just ours, having trouble finding pro gun advocates to speak out because there's really nothing to say at this point. can you think of anything in your political career, where something has happened and you realize you just can't take -- >> 9/11. 9/11 happened and there were a lot of conservatives after 9/11 very wary, very suspicious of federal government expansion, expansion of powers. and i'm one of them. that afterwards, you're like, okay, if the tsa wants to be intrusive, let the tsa be intrusive. if we have to do things that make me uncomfortable, as a small government conservative. fine. this is really, this is a domestic version of 9/11, where everything changed. >> everything did change. one thing joe manchin said yesterday, after he talked about his transformation and the way he thinks about guns and gun rights, was that the president needs to move quickly on this
or something. >> reporter: across the country in syracuse, new york, plows are working overtime, dealing with two consecutive days of snow this weekend, leave thing car stuck with no place to go. >> the weather was bad. the winds were blowing the cars around. you could see the semis were swerving. >> reporter: it's the city's first snowstorm of the season. many are bracing for more to come. >> if you wanted a white christmas, there you go. >>> the gulf coast is even bracing for the worst. >> including some christmas week tornadoes, believe it or not. andrew has the latest now from accuweather. >> while most of the nation will be relatively tranquil for the holidays, we're tracking one disturbance that will give us unsettled weather across portions of the gulf coast. late tonight, the houston area, we'll see thunderstorms popping up, spreading eastward throughout your christmas tuesday. louisiana, mississippi, alabama, georgia, interstates 10 and 20, torrential downpours, the threat for tornadoes. so a very destructive storm system on this saturday. the highest threat for tornadoes we are
with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion influence your politics? caller: it does influence me somewhat but not so much now -- this time with obama. the reason why i say it does a little bit, you have to have a conscience when you deal with anything. especially when you make decisions for other people than yourself, you have to have a conscience. w
on him as the "new york sun" says tonight. i hope his wife understands commitments last a little longer than two years or something. >> whoa, hang on, hang on. that was a bit below the belt, grover. >> hey, if you think a commitment is not for as long as you make it for, the commitment for the pledge as peter king well knows when he signed it is as long as you're in congress you will rein in spending and reform government, not raise taxes. it's not for 500 years or two generations. it's only as long as you're in the house or the senate. if he stayed too long, that's his problem. but you don't tell the bank, oh, the mortgage, wasn't that long time ago? if you make a commitment, you keep it. >> coming up, was mitt romney done in by his own party? when we come back, the republican presidential candidates who may have inflicted mortal damage on him rather than president obama. >> i'm just going to go back to the empty chair, which was going to be todd akin, who was going to talk to me about what hide said about rape and women. since it's just the chair, my obvious question would have about
. >> he was stolen from a street in new york city and now thanks to good samaritans the dog is back home. >> whoa! >>> there goes santa! look at that. >> this sad, an alabama fan, a hat, and tickets to the bcs title game. >> we're going to the game! ♪ >>> welcome to cbs this morning. we begin with this powerful storm system that caused a string of tornadoes that damaged buildings and knocked out hour in places like louisiana, mississippi, and alabama. it dropped heavy snow in parts of texas, oklahoma, and arkansas. >> it's blamed for three deaths and we'll check the forecast but we begin in hard hit mobile alabama where blake brown of our cbs affiliate is watching the tornado damage blake, good morning. >>> good morning this is the scene here in mobile, we have big trees down powerlines down, roof damage and it is just hours after the storm ripped through the city. >> volatile conditions as tornadoes toucheddown around mobile. >> i was screams and hollaring, and i was just scared to death. >> we ran into the cooler, got all of the employees in the cooler, and it cam
pay $100,000 for that egg. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> give it some gas, dan. >> the jet pack looks cool. the hen house, come on, now. every day. that looks like a good gift because that's something if you have that kind of money you can get into, you know what i mean? >> until you crash it. >> i don't have that kind of money. merry christmas, everybody. >>> this morning on "world news now," trouble times two. the west coast gets slammed again by powerful storms at the worst of times. >>> and with the tremendous snowfall and powerful wind swept rain, mother nature is not spending christmas and other parts of the country christmas cheer. it's monday, december 4. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> and good monday morning, on this christmas eve. good to have brandy back in the house. it's been good. we had a little eggnog. >> we're making it a festive holiday. >> glad you're back. welcome back to the overnight rodeo. >> yes, the hours are great. i'm in for paula faris who is on assignment. we've been talking about the snowstorms and the tornadoes. yes, they're back i
to do. when i was working on the speech, i was reading a copy of the new york times, and i saw a group of black women in southern africa carrying signs saying, "one man, one vote." so in my march on washington speech, i said, "'one man, one vote' is the african cry; it is ours, too. it must be ours." and that became the rallying cry for many other young people in the student nonviolent coordinating committee. amy goodman: and yet, you had to change that speech that you gave on that day. rep. john lewis: i was asked to change the speech. some people thought the speech was too radical, too militant. i thought it was a speech for the occasion. it represented the people that we were working with. some people didn't like the use of the word "revolution" or the use of the phrase "black masses." a. philip randolph came to my rescue and said, "there's not anything wrong with the use of 'revolution.' i use it myself sometimes. there's not anything with 'black masses.'" so we kept that part in the speech. but near the end of the speech, i said something like, "if we do not see meaningful progres
, but they do not ever listen to the people. what people are the working for? host: james in new york as a deadline for independents. caller: i just want to point out something. 400% to 1000% increase in salaries versus the workers for the so-called job creators, along the way, the people are not making these increases in salaries. they talk about cutting taxes on the wealthy. well, what about giving money -- a fair percentage of an increase to the people that are doing the work? i never hear anything about that. it just seems to me that the unfairness starts there. host: that is james and new york. the lead story in this morning's boston globe with the headline "modest hope." [video clip] >> i just had a good and constructive discussion with senate and house leadership about how to prevent the tax hike on the middle class. i am optimistic that we may be able to reach an agreement that can pass both houses of in time. senators harry reid and mitch mcconnell are working on such an agreement as we speak. if an agreement is not reached in time between senator harry reid and harry mcconne
still snowing in most area there and it will continue to snow in upstate new york all the way into maine. we have coastal advisories in parts of new jersey, connecticut, massachusetts, as 18-foot waves are crashing onshore. so stay away from those waves even though it's wintertime. almost hurricane-force winds in some places. alina. >> chad myers, graeat to see yo. thank you. that's all for us today. thanks for watching "cnn newsroom." i'm alina cho. i'll be back tomorrow at 5:00 a.m. eastern and again at 11:00 a.m. eastern. "cnn newsroom" with suzanne malveaux starts right now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> welcome to "cnn newsroom." i'm suzanne malveaux. we're keeping you updated on the news here in the united states and around the world. former egyptian president hosni mubarak being transferred to a hospital for medical treatment. the country's state prosecutor ordered the transfer. mubarak is serving life in prison for his role in the killing of demonstrars in egypt's recent demonstration. ian is live in cairo. ian, what are we learning about mubarak's conditio
, new york. >> can we pull off and take a snap? >> pull off tomorrow and take a snap. good advice. >> see you, everybody. we will be right back if we are awake. that really meets your needs a plan and your budget? as you probably know, medicare only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they cover some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you in out-of-pocket medical costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand medicare and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you. with this type of plan, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients... plus, there are no networks, and you'll never need a referral to see a specialist. there's a range of plans to choose from, too. and they all travel with you. anywhere in the country. join the millions who have already enrolled in the only medicare supplement plans endorsed by
. crowley speaks, obviously from new york. first of all, we need to pass the supplemental. the people of the northeast, luckily maryland was somewhat spared on this. but the people of new jersey, the people of new york, the people of connecticut in particular, others as well, have sustained a very, very damaging blow both corporately and individually. we need to act on that. historically supplementals are not paid for, are passed so that we can meet the immediate need. mr. crowley will speak to that. but let me say this. the answer to your question is it's part of the math. if we're going to put our country on a fiscally sustainable path, we're going to have to consider all the expenditures we made, whether we paid for them initially or not, we're going to have to put that into the math and it needs to be a part of the agreement. i've said this is a math problem. certainly the dollars we spend will have to be accounted for and will have to be paid for over a longer period of time. but we can amortize that immediate expense that we need to make on behalf of the severely adversely affec
's wednesday, december 12th. look at that shot of new york city. >> wow. >> it's dark at 6:00 on the east coast. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set here in new york city, we have msnbc contributor, mike barnicle. >> in my ear, mika. >> no, he was at the white house. >> i don't understand. where's t.j.? >> he's off today. >> why's that? >> he was busy. he went to the white house. >> that's great. you know, alex went to the white house, too. >> and drove back himself. >> let me get this straight. so alex goes to the white house last night. >> mm-hmm. >> because, you know, right-wing bloggers, we actually -- that's how we get our talking points. they go down -- valerie and david axelrod together make a big pot roast for us. >> mm-hmm. >> and lots of gravy. and we sit around eating it. and i, of course, say okay, give me extra gravy. i'm good with it. >> right. >> best sweet tea i've ever had. >> there's a give and take. >> actually, it was a christmas party. go ahead and do your blog. you sure as hell didn't get mitt romney to like it. they're not attacking me. i wouldn't know. i don't read
and so it took a while. my brother is a writer in new york and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife, back into my first year of legal research because i had to certify, authorize this piece of nonfiction. i felt with a memoir you could just wing it you can't because once you start highlighting things you've got to get authority for it. you even have to get consent from the people that you put photographs and. i had a letter from james meredith right after i left, which is in the book itself and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, we need his permission. i don't need his permission. he sent it to me that he didn't send us the world. i send a form letter to jackson mississippi and he signed it on the backside of the envelope, it's about time you got your book out 50 years later. so it took a long time. yeah, it did take longer than i thought it would but again piecing things together, "u.s. news and world report"'s, "life" magazine, look magazine, all those helped me support my story and the story again again of a protago
are getting some twitter for rick. what is new york city looking like with a nor'easter on thursday. i want to know the answer on that. deadly storm system that pounded the midwest with storm and thousands of tornados heading northeast this morning. oh, my god. that is a tornado. oh, wow. oh, jesus, look at that tornado. >> gretchen: that funnel cocloud was spot indeed mobile, alabama and 10s of thens of people now without power. >> i prayed to god as loud as i could . praying for my safety and i knew and prayed that the truck stayed put and god would protect me. the brutal winds tossed the cars on top of each other and left the neighborhood a complete disaster. >> i never saw one in real life and just to be able to hear one, it is it a mile from where we are. it pretty amazing. toppled treese ended up killing two people in texas and louisiana. oklahoma got about seven inches of snow in that state . the weather was to blame for a massive car pile up on interstate 40. a woman died in another highway crash nearby. >> we talked about the flights all over the u.s. are cancelled . logan internat
by the killer in rochester, new york, who targeted the firefighters as they responded to that massive fire. the gruesome reason he set his neighborhood aflame. >>> and a million-dollar mixup. this family got the wrong lottery ticket. and struck it rich. now, they say they're set for life. >>> and a very good wednesday morning to you, america. we hope you all had a very merry christmas, if it's something you celebrate. great to have all of you with us this morning. robin, george, lara at home with their families. great to have paula faris, and rachel smith, host of "on the red carpet" back with us this morning. >>> and we're back from the holidays. we're all thinking about returning the gifts, right? just kidding. there's people that are going to be in the return lines. becky worley is here on how to score on both. >>> let's get right to sam. he's been tracking the rough weather that's impacted millions over the week. >> some prepared for it. they were warned in advance. what a night. 34 tornadoes rocked that area. the previous christmas tornadoes had been 12 in 1969. when we tell you this
of inches for new york city and boton. if that's not enough. we have severe storms right now sweeping across the southeast. these are the same storms that brought the tornado you saw pictures of earlier to mobile, alabama. we're not done yet. frequent lightning strikes, in georgia. luckily, today, a smaller geographic area, but a busy day, people heading back to the stores and traveling today. right here across parts of south carolina and parts of north carolina, are you seeing the threat of severe weather and the eastern half of georgia, jacksonville, florida. if you are driving in the region, please make sure you are aware of damage. we have mountain snow out west. a really unsettled weather pattern and unusual for this holiday week. alina. >> have you been very busy, bone eschneider. >>> other top stories, wleerning about that guy that killed firefighters on christmas eve morning. the man left a ♪. i still have to get ready to see how much of the neighborhood i can burn down and doing what i like doing best, killing people. early monday morning, that guy set fire to his suburban rochest
to say the scariest thing to me with respect to newtown was when i g-chatted my fellow editor in new york to plot out coverage, and we knew exactly what to do because we had done it three times before. it had gotten so routine and so disturbing to us and i'm worried i'll be writing the same story. >> we can't desensitize ourselves to this, though. >> listen, we're not going to. i've heard about '68 as far as what califano said and how quickly we have to move. this is different. the horrors of martin luther king, the horrors of bobby kennedy, the horrors of all the gun violence through the years, a million americans killed. mark halperin, as horrific as all of those murders have been, nothing has jarred americans like what happened last friday. it just hasn't. americans aren't going to forget this. >> they're not. >> they're not going to forget this, and they're expecting action. you worry, again, if republicans and democrats can't come to an agreement on rounding decisions for ten years, how are they going to address the bigger issues? >> well, we don't really know how the fiscal cliff's
writes this in "the new york times." republicans have to realize that they are going to cave on tax rates. the only question is what they get in return. do you agree? >> not necessarily at all, because i believe if you raise the base upon which the tax rate is applied, you can raise revenue and keep the rates where they are. >> explain that. let me stop you there. when you raise the base of which the tax rate is applied, explain what you mean. >> capping deductions so you can't use deductions to offset tax obligations. that creates more revenue but the rates stay the same. as erskine bowles commission can go down as much as from 35% to 29% at the upper level. the same thing ronald reagan and tip o'neill did in 1986. in 1986 the top marginal rate it was 70%. it was lowered to 28%. we can take that approach again. >> you know, you brought up the fact that you are in real est e estate. one of the items that will be on the table is the mortgage deduction and one of the kr criticisms that the white house had, for instance on the boehner plan, is there were no details there on deductions. how
like pennsylvania and new york. some minor disruptions during the day today. the bigger story is what happens during the day tomorrow. we think we're going to see a widespread severe weather outbreak probably in eastern texas, louisiana, mississippi alabama, and georgia. we may see numerous tornadoes, some of them could be on the strong side. so we urge you to stay vigilant if you're in the southeast. what we also have going on on the northern side of this system is a lot of heavy snow. it's good news and bad news. the good news is a white christmas in places like oklahoma city, little rock and maybe southern parts of st. louis. the bad news is this storm moves into the ohio valley, great lakes, and interior northeast on wednesday. some places seeing over a foot of snow, and that's going to cause major travel problems as we head on into wednesday, especially, and probably thursday morning as well. jeff? >> jeff, thank you very much. >>> ten days after the connecticut school shooting, the debate over gun control continues after the national rifle association took q
details about that shocking christmas crime in upstate new york. a gunman who ambushed and killed two firefighters left behind a chilling note about his deadly plan. with more, abc's linsey davis is here with the latest. this is a tough one. >> reporter: it really is. lots of new developments to report, including that the death toll has risen to three. and the gun recovered by police, a military-style semiautomatic bushmaster, the same used in the elementary school massacre in newtown, connecticut. investigators continue to comb through what's left of this webster home. the scene of an ambush attack set by this man, william spengler, that killed two firefighters and injured two others. overnight, news that a body has been found in the rubble of the spengler home, possibly his sister, cheryl spengler, who neighbors say he had a strained relationship. emotions are high, as fellow firefighters face the grim reality of burying their own. >> intended to burn his neighborhood down and tried to put down as many people as possible before stopping. >> reporter: police say spengler fired from a
students. a private school in new york discovered that gaining admittance is hardly the same as gaining acceptance. jason carol explains. >> you are sitting in a classroom and realize all of a sudden you really are a minority. >> reporter: it is a vealing look at a subject few talk openly about. >> the tragedy of an undiverse place is that you don't have the full sound, just that there are pieces of the spectrum just missing. >> reporter: the experience of being admitted yet feeling like an outcast inspired students at new york's trinity school to film a documentary called allowed to attend. deirdre banten, now a college freshman, remembers her years at trinity well. did you feel like you culturally fit in with the rest of the students there? >> short answer is no. there are some things that are just straight up racist, you know? like the fact that when tuition raised, a lot of people on scholarship were, like, people -- rumor started that it was our fault. there are some things straight up racist where people confused me and my friend c.c. who we don't look anything alike, but we're bo
. a democrat from new york. chair of the democratic congressional campaign committee. nice to have you with us again. i'm always worried when there is not a lot of noise out of washington, d.c. everything quiet. to the point where speaker and the president releasing press releases almost identical. is this good? the talks are moving in a positive turn? >> yeah, look, nothing is certain, but in this case, i think whispering in the white house is better than finger pointing in the media. it suggests, like in any negotiation, the parties serious, trying to work out acceptable compromise. speaker boehner has received pressure from own members looking at polls. including a poll that 60% of the american people want a balanced deal that does ask the wealthiest to do more. they want fundamental debt reduction, spending cuts, which democrats are prepared to do. no news may be good news. >> the tax issue has been debated a lot and expected that the bush tax cuts in some way, shape, or form will expire for the wealthiest 2% of the country. i want to talk about savings and this is where often very hard to
on a sleepy town in new york. this is how it looked around 6:00 in the morning today. there was a massive house fire that ravaged homes overlooking lake ontario. the house fire spread as firefighters tried to dodge gunfire. the firefighters apparently walked into a trap just as they were responding to this. at last word, two firefighters are dead, three other first responders are wounded, and alleged gunman is dead. authorities can't say whether other bodies might be found in the eight homes destroyed or damaged by the fire in the town of webster. shocking, bizarre, tragic today. cnn's poppy harlow is in new york, trying to piece together this horrible chain of events here on christmas eve. so what happened, because authorities are saying potentially this was a trap laid out for the firefighters. >> that's what the police chief gerald pickering said in the last press conference, we're awaiting right now another press conference that should start any minute. but he did say that it appears that possibly these four first responders were lured into what was a trap. it started at 5:35 this mor
confederate flags. "the new york times" reported in that meeting that a considerable section in the seats was devoted to denouncing the 1964 civil rights act. and any review that says that the only key issues in thurmond's career for constitutionalism and national security, i don't think can be taken, i don't think that passes the laugh test. of what we all know about strom thurmond and his career. so i was disappointed that "the wall street journal" felt that this man, let a close relationship with thurmond had been employed by thurmond, he admits that in the review, but then talks about that he was the best person to evaluate the book for the readers. i thought that was disappointing. >> he had no knowledge of what was being done at the time, that edwards, that was going to be, they didn't tell you ahead of time? >> no. >> that he was going to be the person? >> no. >> you have any other papers like the new times or anything -- >> there were no other reviews to the "washington post," washington monthly, if you google "strom thurmond's america" you will find some. and you should google it
responding to a fire in upstate new york. that happened early this morning not because of the fire they were trying to put out, but police in webster, new york say they were shot. three homes burned police say for hours gunshots stopped the firefighters from putting out the fires, forced police s.w.a.t. teams to evacuate the homes in the area. just in, police say the shooter who killed the two firefighters is also dead. they say he set a trap for those firefighters. >>> the nra is standing tough on its opposition to new gun laws in the aftermath of the killings in newtown, connecticut. the ceo went on "meet the press" to defend his call for armed guards in every american school, but here's what a couple of front pages said about wane laperriere. one called him a gun nut and another one headlined with the crazy heest man on earth. laperriere he is not backing down. watch. >> if it's crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our school to protect our children, then call me crazy. i'll tell you what the american people -- i think the american people think it's crazy not to do it. >
york post" and "daily news." "daily news," craziest man on earth, "new york post," "gun nut." grover, you are a member of the board of the nra and i know you agree with the positions of the organization, but do you think that performance helped your cause on friday? >> well, what's interesting is the reaction to when wayne lapierre because he heads the nra. when bill clinton introduced the same idea on april 16th in 1999 after columbine, federal money for armed guards at schools, you didn't see the -- >> but that didn't matter. >> well, it may have, but i think this interesting point that the idea is one that has a bipartisan background, i know that the leadership of the nra was just over in israel meeting with the people who do the training for the people who carry guns in schools to protect children. these are -- this is an idea that seems fairly reasonable, and when presented by bill clinton, you know, new yorkers didn't attack it, and so i think part of what we're seeing i think sadly is, again, rahm emanuel's comment "never let a good crisis go to waste," and gun advocates jumpe
for women. prosecutors say the woman they've charged with pushing a man to his death in front of a new york city subway train on thursday told them she did so because she hates hindus and muslims. her victim was an immigrant from india. doctors in houston report former president george h.w. bush's condition is improving and that he is no longer in intensive care. mr. bush has been hospitalized since last month with a bronchitis-related cough. this week marks the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation, the document deciding that all slaves were to be forever free. to mark the occasion the document signed by president abraham lincoln goes on display in the national archives in washington. now the weather. the chance of rain in the northeast but it will be sunny in the central plains and the southwest. scattered showers in the pacific northwest. the first few days of 2013 will see colder temperatures across most of the country. >> nothing bad. osgood: ahead, meet jamie foxx. >> i had a neighborhood. everybody was going to chump. it was cool. if somebody pulled a gun, they >> osgood
said, once bitten, twice shy. natalie? >> thanks so much, atia. >>> a new york city homeless man has been charged with second-degree murder in the death of a man pushed in front of a subway train. 30-year-old naeem davis is being held without bail. he served two years in prison for robbery. on wednesday, the victim's family spoke out. his daughter says she wishes someone had helped her father off the tracks but said, quote, what is done is done. >>> a candle light vigil in iowa on wednesday. hunters discovered two bodies that are believed to be the missing cousins, 11-year-old lyric cook and 9-year-old elizabeth collins. the girls last seen in july, disappeared while riding their bikes. >>> computer software mogul john mcafee arrested in guatemala city for entering the country illegally. he said he had been seeking asylum there after fleeing belize where he is a person of interest in the shooting death of his neighbor. >>> music legend dave brubeck is being remembered today for bringing jazz to the people. he died just a day shy of his 92nd birthday. perhaps best known for his ground
up in new york, and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife back into my first year legal research because i had to certify, authorize this was a piece of nonfiction, and you have to put down. i felt with a memoir you could just wig it. well, you can't because once you start highlighting things, you have to get authority for it. you even have to get a concept from people who you put photographs in, the consent of the army, consent of all -- i had a letter from james meredith right after i left which is in the book it, and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, well, you need his permission. i didn't need his permission, he sent it to me. but he didn't send it to the world. he signed it, on the back side of the envelope he said t about time you got your book out, 50 years later. so it took a long time. yeah, it did take longer than i thought it would. but, again, piecing things together, "u.s. news & world report," saturday evening, life magazine, look magazine, all those helped me support my story, and with the
and pennsylvania fellows and new york fellows were all good to me. >> like your colleague, daniel akaka and former transportation chairman norman, world war ii was important in the event in their lives and in your life as well. you serve in the most highly decorated unit in the history of the united states army and received a bronze star, distinguished service cross and middle of honor. can you tell us what you learned from that experience, and how did that experience impact your public career? >> well, there are certain things that haunt me even to this day. and that is the realization of that the war can change a person's character and personality. one might be content and say i'm a good person. now, for example one week before i got into the service and put on my uniform i was and sunday school teacher and i sang in acquire. my mother was a devout methodist , christian temperance movement. they don't get any more difficult than that. the whole family was that way. then after training and going overseas, i recalled telling the first german -- killing the first german. the thing that haunts me is
with a set of concrete proposals and new york governor andrew cuomo said thursday he'll push for a new package of gun safety legislation including conmiss skags or mandatory sale of residents' guns to the state. that idea sounds impractical, consider that that was already done in australia. after a mass shooting in that country killed 35 people in 1996, australia's national firearms' act effectively banned assault weapons. the guns were banned and the buy-back program was kpucompuls. they decide after the law took effect the gun homicide rate in that country dropped by 42%. you should also know that 11 gun massacres occurred in the decade before awe stral yee national firearms act and there have been zero mass shootings since, according to the study published in 2009. of course, can that kind of proven policy response is not your thing, there's those like wayne la pierre that have different ideas like packing public schools with armed security officers, a notion so far afield the neerk post, owned by the right-wing but pro gun safety, require perth murdoch printed this page yesterday f
jersey or new york, they get to decide. not the appropriators, not the authorizing committee, the cor corps's going to decide. well, i can tell you one organization that has a problem with priorities in this country today is the corps of engineers. and to blanket whatever they say as a priority versus having government oversight and committee oversight and appropriator oversight, by giving this blanket waiver, what we do is we take away our powers to correct them. and all this does is say that it's not automatically authorized and we will have plenty of time. because all these are mitigation projects. they all ought to be authorized and approved by the committee of jurisdiction as they go forward. all they have to do is come to congress and say, give us approval on this. rather than a blanket approval. and i think we're setting a terrible precedent, because what it says is, in the future, then we're going to let the corps decides what is important rather than the -- corps decide what is important rather than the governors, rather than the state legislature or rather than the congress.
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